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As for your general question: Of course it's safe to apply updates on-the-fly. yum and dnf have been doing that since many years! (Of course, when you see kernel updates, you need to reboot for the changes to become effective).

You also want to know if you need to restart after applying updates using dnf? Then simply install dnf-plugin-tracer (sudo dnf install dnf-plugin-tracer`) It will tell you what processes need a restart.

(Be aware, it slows down your dnf transaction).

There is also a dnf plugin called needs-restarting (See https://dnf-plugins-core.readthedocs.io/en/latest/needs_restarting.html) - you can use that but it's even slower as far as I remember.

Finally you ask for a GUI where you can review the updates. You don't need a GUI for that. Look at dnf update output and hit only 'Y' or 'Enter' when you are ready for updating.

As for your general question: Of course it's safe to apply updates on-the-fly. yum and dnf have been doing that since many years! (Of course, when you see kernel updates, you need to reboot for the changes to become effective).

You also want to know if you need to restart after applying updates using dnf? Then simply install dnf-plugin-tracer (sudo (sudo dnf install dnf-plugin-tracer`) dnf-plugin-tracer) It will tell you what processes need a restart.

(Be aware, it slows down your dnf transaction).

There is also a dnf plugin called needs-restarting (See https://dnf-plugins-core.readthedocs.io/en/latest/needs_restarting.html) - you can use that but it's even slower as far as I remember.

Finally you ask for a GUI where you can review the updates. You don't need a GUI for that. Look at dnf update output and hit only 'Y' or 'Enter' when you are ready for updating. updating.