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Increase Fedora 22 partition size

asked 2015-08-14 11:38:36 -0500

redthree gravatar image

updated 2015-08-14 11:40:01 -0500

Hi, i'd like increase the size of my Fedora partition, I have a dual boot system. If its possible, what's the best process to do this?

fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 931.5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 4DC2AA60-AD4B-4BC0-94E0-C20163D3F701

Device          Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1        2048    1026047    1024000   500M EFI System
/dev/sda2     1026048    1107967      81920    40M unknown
/dev/sda3     1107968    1370111     262144   128M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sda4     1370112    2906111    1536000   750M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda5     2906112 1732218121 1729312010 824.6G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sda6  1732218880 1733185535     966656   472M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda7  1733185536 1733187583       2048     1M BIOS boot
/dev/sda8  1733187584 1734211583    1024000   500M Linux filesystem
/dev/sda9  1734211584 1937985535  203773952  97.2G Linux LVM
/dev/sda10 1937985536 1953523119   15537584   7.4G Windows recovery environment

lsblk

NAME            MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda               8:0    0 931.5G  0 disk 
├─sda1            8:1    0   500M  0 part /boot/efi
├─sda2            8:2    0    40M  0 part 
├─sda3            8:3    0   128M  0 part 
├─sda4            8:4    0   750M  0 part 
├─sda5            8:5    0 824.6G  0 part 
├─sda6            8:6    0   472M  0 part 
├─sda7            8:7    0     1M  0 part 
├─sda8            8:8    0   500M  0 part /boot
├─sda9            8:9    0  97.2G  0 part 
│ ├─fedora-swap 253:0    0   7.8G  0 lvm  [SWAP]
│ ├─fedora-root 253:1    0    50G  0 lvm  /
│ └─fedora-home 253:2    0  39.4G  0 lvm  /home
└─sda10           8:10   0   7.4G  0 part

Thank you

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3 Answers

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answered 2015-08-17 13:06:33 -0500

redthree gravatar image

Thank you both, but I finally decided to get rid of windows. I deleted all partitions and install only Fedora as my main OS.

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Note: Fedora is running quite fast. Depending on how you use your computer, you may sometimes feel uncomfortable with this. Another option you might study could be a long term support alternative such as Centos 7 (to remain in redhat family). I made this choice recently for day by day use, and keep running Fedora updates beside to remain looking for new trends, but with kind of less "stress"...

tonioc gravatar imagetonioc ( 2015-08-18 15:10:28 -0500 )edit
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answered 2015-08-14 12:54:05 -0500

BRPocock gravatar image

In general, you'd probably want to boot from a LiveCD/LiveUSB and run (sudo dnf install gparted on the Live system) GPartEd.

However, the breakdown you show doesn't seem to leave you any room into which to grow, unless you want to remove some partitions that your dually-booted OS might want …

I suppose that one way you could probably do so is to reduce the size of sda5 substantially, then great a new LVM PV (physical volume) partition out of the recovered space, and add it to the VG (volume group) which is currently only sda9; then, you could expand those logical volumes (fedora-root or fedora-home) to take advantage of the added space in the VG.

Or, just remove (sda2 sda3 sda4 sda5 sda6 sda10) and you'd have tonnes of room free.

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answered 2015-08-14 13:35:53 -0500

tonioc gravatar image

Recent releases of Windows (7+) include ability to resize the Windows partition itself. You should first resize this one to the size you really need for it.

Once this is done, you can use gparted or any other tool to create a new partition. After this, use lvm tools (pvcreate, vgextend, lvextend, resize2fs, xfs_growfs...) to extend the size of your volume group logical volumes and filesystems.

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Asked: 2015-08-14 11:38:36 -0500

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Last updated: Aug 17 '15