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How do I change permissions in the /usr directory?

asked 2012-11-06 06:18:35 -0500

cva gravatar image

/usr permissions

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answered 2012-11-06 07:19:10 -0500

kvolny gravatar image

you can use any from the plethora of tools for changing permissions ... the basic commandline tool is chmod - please see the manual page for help

note that /usr is a system directory so you have to have appropriate permissions yourself (the user you are logged in as) to be able to change the permissions (probably, you'll have to login as root)

note also that for normal system operation you really do not have to change anything in /usr - the files and directories there should be under the control of the packaging system, with a few exceptions that are managed automatically by other system tools ... which means, if you have to change permissions manually, you're probably doing something wrong; judging from the tone of the question I'd say rather "certainly" than "probably" - please describe exactly what you are trying to achieve to get a better answer

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Use Crtl-Alt-F2 to switch to a text console and try logging in as root. (Remember, you password is cASe s3ns4tive, so be careful.) If that works, you can do your work right there. When you're done (or if it doesn't work) use CtrlAlt-F8 to return to a GUI.

sideburns gravatar imagesideburns ( 2012-11-07 18:58:23 -0500 )edit
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answered 2012-11-07 15:03:32 -0500

Xhani gravatar image

Gain root privileges (su -), then:

cd /etc/pam.d/

fgrep “user != root” gdm*

On my system it returns two files, gdm and gdm-password; depending on your installed PAM and/or GDM type options there may be more files on your system. The process is the same for all of them:

cp -a gdm gdm.orig

vi gdm

…and simply delete the line that looks like:

auth required pamsucceedif.so user != root quiet

Repeat the process with each file that matched the above fgrep and you’re all set, you can now log in as root from GDM.

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This doesn't address the problem the OP is working with, at all. It's also horrible advice.

randomuser gravatar imagerandomuser ( 2012-11-11 14:37:35 -0500 )edit

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Asked: 2012-11-06 06:18:35 -0500

Seen: 2,220 times

Last updated: Nov 07 '12