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My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if an openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

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My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if an openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if an openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26.2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new kernel, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity --sanity to verify the driver, especially if an any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26.2017: 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new kernel, driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds. seconds.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

Update 06/28/2017: Up to kernel 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 and wine 2.11-1. Absolutely no problems with dkms updates, and the drivers from nvidia are still at 381.22 being the latest available.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

Update 06/28/2017: Up to kernel 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 and wine 2.11-1. Absolutely no problems with dkms updates, and the drivers from nvidia are still at 381.22 being the latest available.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

Update 06/28/2017: Up to kernel 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 and wine 2.11-1. Absolutely no problems with dkms updates, and the drivers from nvidia are still at 381.22 being the latest available.

Update 05\6/01/2018: Running Fedora 28, Kernel 4.16.12 and Nvidia 396.24. Wine staging 3.9, with pba patches applied. Able to run World of Warcraft Beta and Live versions.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 381.22 396.24 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

Update 06/28/2017: Up to kernel 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 and wine 2.11-1. Absolutely no problems with dkms updates, and the drivers from nvidia are still at 381.22 being the latest available.

Update 05\6/01/2018: Running Fedora 28, Kernel 4.16.12 and Nvidia 396.24. Wine staging 3.9, with pba patches applied. Able to run World of Warcraft Beta and Live versions.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 396.24 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

Update 06/28/2017: Up to kernel 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 and wine 2.11-1. Absolutely no problems with dkms updates, and the drivers from nvidia are still at 381.22 being the latest available.

Update 05\6/01/2018: Running Fedora 28, Kernel 4.16.12 and Nvidia 396.24. Wine staging 3.9, with pba patches applied. Able to run World of Warcraft Beta and Live versions.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates.updates. Shown here are the steps I took, to install Nvidia on a fresh install. Hope this helps

start terminal

sudo -i
dracut --omit-drivers nouveau /boot/initramfs-$(uname -r).img $(uname -r) --force
systemctl set-default multi-user.target (boots into a text only mode)
reboot

login as root

dnf install kernel-devel-$(uname -r) gcc dkms acpid
bash /dirofsavedfile/NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-...run (driver version number in place of ..)
Accept license, say yes to DKMS and 32 bit library installation. If running in secure boot EFI, you will be possibly need to make a digital key.  I do not fully understand that procedure, so I disabled secure boot in my bios and did not have to do that step.
systemctl set-default graphical.target
reboot

My system with an Nvidia Graphics Card

This is informational only. I hope to provide details for people, who are setting up Fedora with Nvidia Graphics Cards on Desktop Computers. This may help some with laptops as well, but the intended target is anyone having problems with Nvidia installation or kernel updates after installation. I will detail the steps I use, to stay current, and to automate the kernel updates, when Nvidia releases new drivers. As of this post, I am on kernel 4.10.16-200 with Nvidia Proprietary driver 381.22. I have Steam and Wine installed, and use Wine64 to run World of Warcraft on my computer. My system is an AMD FX-6300 6 core, clocked to 3.8Ghz with 16GB Ram, 320Gb hard drive, and Geforce GTX 970 running a single display. I will hit the highlighs of my setup and installation, and should more details be needed to help others, I will deal with that individually. Pick a fedora you want to install, I personally prefered the cinnamon, as the desktop is clean and small memory footprint. If you get the black screen during live dvd install, use the live dvd grub troubleshooting choice, which adds nomodeset to the linux command line. Once that is up, remove all reference to nouveau, there are various posts in this group that detail how to kill nouveau completely, so I will not be going into detail on that. Download the driver you want to run from https://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/ and install the one you want. I am currently running 396.24 with no issues. Nice performance boost in WoW with Wine64 also. Prior to running the installer from nvidia, make sure the kernel-devel and kernel-headers are installed. When i run the driver installation, I answer yes to dkms and yes to 32 bit compatibility driver. if it find existng 32 bit files, for some reason, be sure to select overwrite and install, so it finishes correctly. When it finishes building the kermel module, it asks to update xconfig, and I let it. Since I want to monitor fan and power on the graphics card, I do run sudo nvidia-xconfig --cool-bits=12 to enable the nvidia-settings to show and allow adjustment for the fan and clock speeds. When dkms sees a upgrade to kernel-devel, usually during the kernel update install, it will pause the kernel update and you may think something is broken. It takes around 3 minutes, on my system, to build the driver module for the new kernel being installed, and the update continues, and completes successfully. Do not panic if the dnf update pauses just after upgrading kernel-devel as that is the dkms building the driver. Just for the sake of my own sanity, I periodically run sudo nvidia-installer --sanity to verify the driver, especially if any openGL libraries have been updated. If it finds a problem, I simply reinstall the driver, and redo the dkms and 32 bit, as detailed here. Also of course, if I find a newer driver at nvidia I also reinstall. Generally it seems that nvidia runs about 3 or 4 kernel updates, before they release new drivers, so not having to do anything unless I want to change drivers. I have used nvidia proprietary since kernel 4.8, and following this method has been very simple to maintain. I hope anyone who sees this, takes it as being a positive help, and it in no way is intended to be anything beyond what works for me. If I have missed a step, or you are unclear on anything, by all means, comment, and I will try to respond quickly.

Update 05/26/2017: Kernel upgrade to 4.10.17-200 and wine upgrade to 2.8.1 staging. I run wine and wine64 as some things I do in windows are 64 bit. All is well, dkms updated kernel automatically. Timed the pause while dkms built the new driver, and it was 2 minutes 50 seconds.

Update 06/28/2017: Up to kernel 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 and wine 2.11-1. Absolutely no problems with dkms updates, and the drivers from nvidia are still at 381.22 being the latest available.

Update 05\6/01/2018: Running Fedora 28, Kernel 4.16.12 and Nvidia 396.24. Wine staging 3.9, with pba patches applied. Able to run World of Warcraft Beta and Live versions.

If an admin wants to make a sticky from this, I would keep it current, based on kernel and driver updates. Shown here are the steps I took, to install Nvidia on a fresh install. Hope this helps

start terminal

sudo -i
dracut --omit-drivers nouveau /boot/initramfs-$(uname -r).img $(uname -r) --force
systemctl set-default multi-user.target (boots into a text only mode)
 reboot

login as root

dnf install kernel-devel-$(uname -r) gcc dkms acpid
bash /dirofsavedfile/NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-...run (driver version number in place of ..)
Accept license, say yes to DKMS and 32 bit library installation. If running in secure boot EFI, you will be possibly need to make a digital key.  I do not fully understand that procedure, so I disabled secure boot in my bios and did not have to do that step.
 systemctl set-default graphical.target
reboot