After upgrade to F30, uname shows kernel for F29; rebuilt Grub2

2 out of our 31 lab computers that were upgraded from Fedora 29 to Fedora 30 are showing kernel’s in use from Fedora 29.
cat /etc/redhat-release Fedora release 30 (Thirty)
then:
uname -a Linux ourhost.edu 4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon Dec 24 01:58:57 UTC 2018 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
However there does appear to be a F30 kernel:
rpm -q kernel kernel-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64 kernel-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64 kernel-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64

Just to be sure, from advice from an older thread, I ran:
dnf reinstall shim grub2-efi kernel kernel-* grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg

I rebooted and the same happens. Here are the boot options I see:

You can see these are dual-boot machines with Windows 10. I also ran dnf distro-sync --allowerasing to no avail.

1 Like

Hi @RobbieTheK. Welcome to the community. Please have a look at the posts in the #start-here category when you have a minute to spare.

This looks like an updrade didn’t complete properly. Were there any errors during the process if you’d noticed?

Could we have the output of the following please?

rpm -qa \*kernel\*
rpm -qa \*kernel\*
kernel-modules-extra-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64
kernel-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64
kernel-core-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.10.0-3.fc30.x86_64
kernel-modules-extra-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
kernel-modules-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
kernel-headers-5.0.16-300.fc30.x86_64
kernel-core-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64
kernel-modules-extra-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-core-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-modules-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.12.0-2.fc30.x86_64
texlive-l3kernel-svn48022-25.fc30.noarch
kernel-modules-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64

My reply is pending approval for a while now, can someone check on it?

rpm -qa \*kernel\*
kernel-modules-extra-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64
kernel-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64
kernel-core-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.10.0-3.fc30.x86_64
kernel-modules-extra-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
kernel-modules-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
kernel-headers-5.0.16-300.fc30.x86_64
kernel-core-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64
kernel-modules-extra-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-core-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64
kernel-modules-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64
abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.12.0-2.fc30.x86_64
texlive-l3kernel-svn48022-25.fc30.noarch
kernel-modules-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64

Either you just didn’t actually reinstall the packages or your computer is generating entries in the wrong format.

The package names are shim-x64 (or shim-ia32) and grub2-efi-x64 (or grub2-efi-ia32). Just run dnf reinstall shim* grub* kernel* (I’ll explain why I say “grub*” in a second)

This doesn’t look like a blscfg (fedora’s new bootloader configuration) configuration (yours says “Workstation Edition,” mine says “Thirty”). The issue is that (to my knowledge) grubby, which generates entries for new kernels, now only generates entries in blscfg format, where the “grubby-deprecated” provides the old functionality. What I don’t get is why grub2-mkconfig didn’t work. Perhaps that’s because the package wasn’t actually reinstalled.

Can you send your /etc/default/grub and grub.cfg?

OK I reinstalled them all. Re-ran the grub2mkconfig, still getting:
uname -a Linux ouserver.edu 4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon Dec 24 01:58:57 UTC 2018 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Here you go:

cat /etc/default/grub
GRUB_TIMEOUT=5
GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR="$(sed 's, release .*$,,g' /etc/system-release)"
GRUB_DEFAULT=saved
GRUB_DISABLE_SUBMENU=true
GRUB_TERMINAL_OUTPUT="console"
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/root rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/swap rhgb quiet"
GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY="true"
GRUB_ENABLE_BLSCFG=true
[root@ll612-17 kudyba]# locate grub.cfg
/boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg
/boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg.rpmsave

And

cat /boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg
#
# DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE
#
# It is automatically generated by grub2-mkconfig using templates
# from /etc/grub.d and settings from /etc/default/grub
#

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/00_header ###
set pager=1

if [ -f ${config_directory}/grubenv ]; then
  load_env -f ${config_directory}/grubenv
elif [ -s $prefix/grubenv ]; then
  load_env
fi
if [ "${next_entry}" ] ; then
   set default="${next_entry}"
   set next_entry=
   save_env next_entry
   set boot_once=true
else
   set default="${saved_entry}"
fi

if [ x"${feature_menuentry_id}" = xy ]; then
  menuentry_id_option="--id"
else
  menuentry_id_option=""
fi

export menuentry_id_option

if [ "${prev_saved_entry}" ]; then
  set saved_entry="${prev_saved_entry}"
  save_env saved_entry
  set prev_saved_entry=
  save_env prev_saved_entry
  set boot_once=true
fi

function savedefault {
  if [ -z "${boot_once}" ]; then
    saved_entry="${chosen}"
    save_env saved_entry
  fi
}

function load_video {
  if [ x$feature_all_video_module = xy ]; then
    insmod all_video
  else
    insmod efi_gop
    insmod efi_uga
    insmod ieee1275_fb
    insmod vbe
    insmod vga
    insmod video_bochs
    insmod video_cirrus
  fi
}

terminal_output console
if [ x$feature_timeout_style = xy ] ; then
  set timeout_style=menu
  set timeout=5
# Fallback normal timeout code in case the timeout_style feature is
# unavailable.
else
  set timeout=5
fi
### END /etc/grub.d/00_header ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/01_users ###
if [ -f ${prefix}/user.cfg ]; then
  source ${prefix}/user.cfg
  if [ -n "${GRUB2_PASSWORD}" ]; then
    set superusers="root"
    export superusers
    password_pbkdf2 root ${GRUB2_PASSWORD}
  fi
fi
### END /etc/grub.d/01_users ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/08_fallback_counting ###
insmod increment
# Check if boot_counter exists and boot_success=0 to activate this behaviour.
if [ -n "${boot_counter}" -a "${boot_success}" = "0" ]; then
  # if countdown has ended, choose to boot rollback deployment,
  # i.e. default=1 on OSTree-based systems.
  if  [ "${boot_counter}" = "0" -o "${boot_counter}" = "-1" ]; then
    set default=1
    set boot_counter=-1
  # otherwise decrement boot_counter
  else
    decrement boot_counter
  fi
  save_env boot_counter
fi
### END /etc/grub.d/08_fallback_counting ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/10_linux ###
insmod part_gpt
insmod lvm
insmod ext2
set root='lvmid/HXUIBG-pPSc-vbGa-2pQ8-meYd-TOPD-A2YFDQ/ztrNsZ-2NyP-tJxj-fXVA-Fiw5-Sq2z-Iq107z'
if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint='lvmid/HXUIBG-pPSc-vbGa-2pQ8-meYd-TOPD-A2YFDQ/ztrNsZ-2NyP-tJxj-fXVA-Fiw5-Sq2z-Iq107z'  664c3c0d-5c50-4817-946e-adca82e47eb4
else
  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 664c3c0d-5c50-4817-946e-adca82e47eb4
fi
insmod part_gpt
insmod lvm
insmod ext2
set boot='lvmid/HXUIBG-pPSc-vbGa-2pQ8-meYd-TOPD-A2YFDQ/ztrNsZ-2NyP-tJxj-fXVA-Fiw5-Sq2z-Iq107z'
if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=boot --hint='lvmid/HXUIBG-pPSc-vbGa-2pQ8-meYd-TOPD-A2YFDQ/ztrNsZ-2NyP-tJxj-fXVA-Fiw5-Sq2z-Iq107z'  664c3c0d-5c50-4817-946e-adca82e47eb4
else
  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=boot 664c3c0d-5c50-4817-946e-adca82e47eb4
fi

# This section was generated by a script. Do not modify the generated file - all changes
# will be lost the next time file is regenerated. Instead edit the BootLoaderSpec files.
#
# The blscfg command parses the BootLoaderSpec files stored in /boot/loader/entries and
# populates the boot menu. Please refer to the Boot Loader Specification documentation
# for the files format: https://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Specifications/BootLoaderSpec/.

set default_kernelopts="root=/dev/mapper/lvm2-root ro rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/root rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/swap rhgb quiet "

insmod blscfg
blscfg
### END /etc/grub.d/10_linux ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/10_reset_boot_success ###
insmod increment
# Hiding the menu is ok if last boot was ok or if this is a first boot attempt to boot the entry
if [ "${boot_success}" = "1" -o "${boot_indeterminate}" = "1" ]; then
  set menu_hide_ok=1
else
  set menu_hide_ok=0 
fi
# Reset boot_indeterminate after a successful boot, increment otherwise
if [ "${boot_success}" = "1" ] ; then
  set boot_indeterminate=0
else
  increment boot_indeterminate
fi
# Reset boot_success for current boot 
set boot_success=0
save_env boot_success boot_indeterminate
### END /etc/grub.d/10_reset_boot_success ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/12_menu_auto_hide ###
if [ x$feature_timeout_style = xy ] ; then
  if [ "${menu_show_once}" ]; then
    unset menu_show_once
    save_env menu_show_once
    set timeout_style=menu
    set timeout=60
  elif [ "${menu_auto_hide}" -a "${menu_hide_ok}" = "1" ]; then
    set orig_timeout_style=${timeout_style}
    set orig_timeout=${timeout}
    if [ "${fastboot}" = "1" ]; then
      # timeout_style=menu + timeout=0 avoids the countdown code keypress check
      set timeout_style=menu
      set timeout=0
    else
      set timeout_style=hidden
      set timeout=1
    fi
  fi
fi
### END /etc/grub.d/12_menu_auto_hide ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_linux_xen ###

### END /etc/grub.d/20_linux_xen ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_ppc_terminfo ###
### END /etc/grub.d/20_ppc_terminfo ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ###
menuentry 'Windows Boot Manager (on /dev/sda1)' --class windows --class os $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-efi-3C49-68B0' {
	insmod part_gpt
	insmod fat
	set root='hd0,gpt1'
	if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
	  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,gpt1 --hint-efi=hd0,gpt1 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,gpt1  3C49-68B0
	else
	  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 3C49-68B0
	fi
	chainloader /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/BootMgFW.efi
}
# Other OS found, undo autohiding of menu unless menu_auto_hide=2
if [ "${orig_timeout_style}" -a "${menu_auto_hide}" != "2" ]; then
  set timeout_style=${orig_timeout_style}
  set timeout=${orig_timeout}
fi
### END /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_uefi-firmware ###
menuentry 'System setup' $menuentry_id_option 'uefi-firmware' {
	fwsetup
}
### END /etc/grub.d/30_uefi-firmware ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/40_custom ###
# This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries.  Simply type the
# menu entries you want to add after this comment.  Be careful not to change
# the 'exec tail' line above.
### END /etc/grub.d/40_custom ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/41_custom ###
if [ -f  ${config_directory}/custom.cfg ]; then
  source ${config_directory}/custom.cfg
elif [ -z "${config_directory}" -a -f  $prefix/custom.cfg ]; then
  source $prefix/custom.cfg;
fi
### END /etc/grub.d/41_custom ###

@RobbieTheK, @benjamind, I’ve checked posted grub.cfg, compared it to mine. It looks like (just from looking at the files, without reading docs) with latest changes with blscfg in F30 we should actually check the contents of /boot/loader/entries/ folder.

In the grub.cfg itself only this section now refers to all Fedora’s boot entries:

The entries themselves are taken by blscfg from /boot/loader/entries/ (check the comment in grub.cfg immediately above the lines I quoted).

So regenerating grub.cfg itself won’t change anything, we need to properly regenerate blscfg entries. Presumably new grubby @benjamind mentioned should do it, not grub2-mkconfig. I’ll try to look into it and post here if I find anything. blscfg is all new for me too :slight_smile:

Edit 1: The entries files themselves are human-readable and easy to understand, I’m quite sure we can easily add new boot entry by copying existing file and modifying it to point to the kernel we need (assuming said kernel is actually installed).

Edit 2: To add new already installed kernel to /boot/loader/entries/ you can use the following command:

sudo grubby --add-kernel /boot/vmlinuz-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64 --title="Fedora (5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64) 30 (Thirty)"

I’ve verified, it works (i.e. creates new .conf file in /boot/loader/entries/).

Edit 3: Actually, reinstalling kernel should have added new entry to /boot/loader/entries/.

I’d also check what boot entries grubby sees (before manually adding kernel 5.0.17 boot entry and once more after adding it) with:

sudo grubby --info ALL
1 Like

Here are the results of the commands:

grubby --info ALL
index=0
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64"
args="ro rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/root rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/swap rhgb quiet"
root="/dev/mapper/lvm2-root"
initrd="/boot/initramfs-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64.img"
title="Fedora (5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64) 30 (Thirty)"
id="f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64"
index=1
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64"
args="ro rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/root rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/swap rhgb quiet"
root="/dev/mapper/lvm2-root"
initrd="/boot/initramfs-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64.img"
title="Fedora (5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64) 29 (Twenty Nine)"
id="f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64"
index=2
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64"
args="ro rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/root rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/swap rhgb quiet"
root="/dev/mapper/lvm2-root"
initrd="/boot/initramfs-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64.img"
title="Fedora (4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64) 29 (Twenty Nine)"
id="f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64"
index=3
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-0-rescue-f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0"
args="ro rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/root rd.lvm.lv=lvm2/swap rhgb quiet"
root="/dev/mapper/lvm2-root"
initrd="/boot/initramfs-0-rescue-f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0.img"
title="Fedora (0-rescue-f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0) 30 (Workstation Edition)"
id="f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-0-rescue"

Then:
grubby --add-kernel /boot/vmlinuz-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64 --title="Fedora (5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64) 30 (Thirty)" An entry for kernel 5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64 already exists, adding /boot/loader/entries/f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64.0~custom.conf

After reboot still F29:
uname -a Linux ourhost.edu 5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon May 20 15:39:10 UTC 2019 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

And this:
ls -l /boot/loader/entries/

total 20
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 402 May 26 15:30 f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-0-rescue.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 268 May 26 15:30 f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-4.19.12-301.fc29.x86_64.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 264 May 26 15:30 f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-5.0.17-200.fc29.x86_64.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 307 May 30 09:19 f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64.0~custom.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 259 May 29 23:27 f1ab98d6b41846d4bf74abdf674203d0-5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64.conf

If these are EFI bios machines, then you should be able to run bootctl to simply get a status of your bootloader efi entries. It can also be used to manipulate the bootloader through systemd-boot. Follow this link if you want to check it out further… https://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/bootctl.html or use the man page for it with man bootctl. With the new BLS being followed, there should be less pain in setting up multi-boot systems, especially efi ones but generally across the spectrum.

@RobbieTheK, as you can see in output of grubby --info ALL, there’s an entry for F30 kernel 5.0.17-300.fc30.x86_64. Do you actually see it upon booting?

Can you repost screenshot of grub menu upon boot (previous one should have changed by now).

Perhaps this will help. Looks like there is a difference between workstations that did upgrade to F30 and ones that didn’t/. Here’s the “bad” one:
bootctl
Couldn’t find EFI system partition. It is recommended to mount it to /boot or /efi.
Alternatively, use --path= to specify path to mount point.
System:
Firmware: n/a (n/a)
Secure Boot: disabled
Setup Mode: user

Current Boot Loader:
      Product: n/a
     Features: ✗ Boot counting
               ✗ Menu timeout control
               ✗ One-shot menu timeout control
               ✗ Default entry control
               ✗ One-shot entry control
          ESP: n/a
         File: └─n/a

Boot Loaders Listed in EFI Variables:
        Title: rEFInd
           ID: 0x0001
       Status: active, boot-order
    Partition: /dev/disk/by-partuuid/614009be-acab-46ee-a89a-a82eae70bb4b
         File: └─/EFI/refind/refind_x64.efi

        Title: UEFI: HGST HTS721010A9E630
           ID: 0x0002
       Status: active, boot-order
    Partition: /dev/disk/by-partuuid/614009be-acab-46ee-a89a-a82eae70bb4b
         File: └─EFI/boot/bootx64.efi

        Title: Choose Your Operating System
           ID: 0x0000
       Status: active, boot-order
    Partition: /dev/disk/by-partuuid/b10e02a2-0931-4a6d-b108-2791a30efe4d
         File: └─/EFI/fedora/grubx64.efi

Here’s the “good” one:
bootctl status systemd-boot not installed in ESP. System: Firmware: n/a (n/a) Secure Boot: disabled Setup Mode: user

Current Boot Loader:
      Product: n/a
     Features: ✗ Boot counting
               ✗ Menu timeout control
               ✗ One-shot menu timeout control
               ✗ Default entry control
               ✗ One-shot entry control
          ESP: n/a
         File: └─n/a

Available Boot Loaders on ESP:
          ESP: /boot/efi (/dev/disk/by-partuuid/614009be-acab-46ee-a89a-a82eae70bb4b)
         File: └─/EFI/BOOT/BOOTIA32.EFI
         File: └─/EFI/BOOT/BOOTX64.EFI

Boot Loaders Listed in EFI Variables:
        Title: rEFInd Boot Manager
           ID: 0x0001
       Status: active, boot-order
    Partition: /dev/disk/by-partuuid/614009be-acab-46ee-a89a-a82eae70bb4b
         File: └─/EFI/refind/refind_x64.efi

        Title: Choose Desired Operating System
           ID: 0x0000
       Status: active, boot-order
    Partition: /dev/disk/by-partuuid/b10e02a2-0931-4a6d-b108-2791a30efe4d
         File: └─/EFI/refind/refind_x64.efi

        Title: UEFI: HGST HTS721010A9E630
           ID: 0x0002
       Status: active, boot-order
    Partition: /dev/disk/by-partuuid/614009be-acab-46ee-a89a-a82eae70bb4b
         File: └─EFI/boot/bootx64.efi

0 entries, no entry could be determined as default.

AFAIK Grub2 is no longer the actual Grub2 package but a series of scripts that use bootctl and systemd-boot to manipulate things, and most of the manipulated files are human readable text so configuration should be less painful. Emphasis on should.

I think they may be older MBR, so BIOS machines not EFI. Then you will need to use the grubby tool to manipulate things a bit. For instance it can create a new entry based upon a current working one, so the F29 bootable entries can be used as a starting point to create an entry for the F30 kernels and initramfs.

So take a look at grubby --copy-default for a start, this would copy your default kernel entry (presumably F29 in this case) and make a new entry without the kernel or initrd files that you would modify to suit whatever kernel and initrd files you wanted to boot into. I think there is also a grub2 command for BLS conversion too, I’ll do some digging into that later or you can search it.

If these machines are indeed non-UEFI ones, then there’s a good chance this is what’s going on.

As @RobbieTheK posted about grub2-efi and /boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg I assumed he knew machines used UEFI, not bios boot.

Then again, this:

points to Fedora thinking it’s a UEFI system.

1 Like

@RobbieTheK, you can use this to verify if current system were booted in EFI or Legacy (i.e. bios or non-UEFI) mode:

test -d /sys/firmware/efi && echo EFI || echo Legacy

Yes they are all the same:

test -d /sys/firmware/efi && echo EFI || echo Legacy
EFI

What I can check tomorrow is if in the BIOS the Secure Boot option within UEFI is enabled on these 2 computers.

AFAIK, Secure Boot shouldn’t interfere here, I’ve used Fedora with it enabled. I’d verify that grub is using that same grub.cfg file you’ve posted and not some other. That’s why I asked for a new screenshot :slight_smile:

This line from bootctl output from “bad” system is also quite interesting:

I would check (for bad system) output of these commands to verify there’s no confusion with partitions (especially EFI one):

cat /etc/fstab
blkid
sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda
1 Like

Here you go:
cat /etc/fstab

#
# /etc/fstab
# Created by anaconda on Tue Jan  9 11:03:35 2018
#
# Accessible filesystems, by reference, are maintained under '/dev/disk'
# See man pages fstab(5), findfs(8), mount(8) and/or blkid(8) for more info
#
/dev/mapper/lvm2-root   /                       ext4    defaults        1 1
UUID=c7d71ab6-c585-4b73-9f53-ec139989aba3 /boot                   ext4    defaults        1 2
UUID=4BD6-32AC          /boot/efi               vfat    umask=0077,shortname=winnt 0 2
/dev/mapper/lvm2-home   /home                   ext4    defaults        1 2
/dev/mapper/lvm2-tmp    /tmp                    ext4    defaults        1 2
/dev/mapper/lvm2-usrlocal /usr/local              ext4    defaults        1 2
/dev/mapper/lvm2-swap   swap                    swap    defaults        0 0

And:
`blkid

/dev/sda1: LABEL="ESP" UUID="3C49-68B0" TYPE="vfat" PARTLABEL="EFI system partition" PARTUUID="b10e02a2-0931-4a6d-b108-2791a30efe4d"
/dev/sda2: PARTLABEL="Microsoft reserved partition" PARTUUID="73a4595d-5414-4c72-90b1-e3367b7b3623"
/dev/sda3: LABEL="OS" UUID="B20A70560A701A15" TYPE="ntfs" PARTLABEL="Basic data partition" PARTUUID="6bb773dd-ab2a-47f1-b93b-21b3d234c876"
/dev/sda4: UUID="92DE7AB4DE7A9069" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="99b08184-2ec3-4246-bdf7-eab04fcf2999"
/dev/sda5: LABEL="WINRETOOLS" UUID="B84A181A4A17D3CA" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="2b3c7ea9-3f6e-4985-8fcc-9b33e041a38a"
/dev/sda6: LABEL="linux-boot" UUID="c7d71ab6-c585-4b73-9f53-ec139989aba3" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="2b0533d7-286a-4191-8fb6-4f62c3af3e19"
/dev/sda7: UUID="4BD6-32AC" TYPE="vfat" PARTLABEL="EFI System Partition" PARTUUID="614009be-acab-46ee-a89a-a82eae70bb4b"
/dev/sda8: UUID="pOPkXr-LNfc-Xd3H-HGIq-C1vB-bkZS-ZO517i" TYPE="LVM2_member" PARTUUID="b4c66698-9cb0-43e0-909e-8147178463c6"
/dev/sda9: LABEL="Windows share" UUID="2C0DEAD9716BB331" TYPE="ntfs" PTTYPE="dos" PARTLABEL="/dev/sda9" PARTUUID="16efd24d-1f04-403e-9fd3-5578a6d23352"
/dev/sda10: UUID="b3T6Qd-8c8x-Rtrs-TY8J-9Sm0-UbOR-mGXLnD" TYPE="LVM2_member" PARTLABEL="/dev/sda10" PARTUUID="e66107a0-cbf7-4598-8b41-b1716e37022a"
/dev/mapper/lvm2-root: LABEL="lvm-linux-root" UUID="664c3c0d-5c50-4817-946e-adca82e47eb4" TYPE="ext4"
/dev/mapper/lvm2-swap: LABEL="lvm-linux-swap" UUID="f256e99c-b723-4ae9-bb78-ed0c8f7ea9a8" TYPE="swap"
/dev/mapper/lvm2-home: LABEL="lvm-linux-home" UUID="d799743b-8e62-4df7-ae48-3052545ff8f2" TYPE="ext4"
/dev/mapper/lvm2-tmp: LABEL="lvm-linux-tmp" UUID="ec635d17-9c7d-42e4-a70e-155f4c251b52" TYPE="ext4"
/dev/mapper/lvm2-usrlocal: LABEL="lvm-usrlocal" UUID="279e207d-418b-4130-9851-b81a786676f9" TYPE="ext4"`

Lastly:
fdisk -l /dev/sda Disk /dev/sda: 931.5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors

Disk model: HGST HTS721010A9
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 9E16F649-81C6-4B4F-96B2-2743AC3C47E2

Device          Start        End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1        2048    1026047   1024000   500M EFI System
/dev/sda2     1026048    1288191    262144   128M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sda3     1288192  483633151 482344960   230G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sda4   974798848  975738879    940032   459M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda5   975740928  976746495   1005568   491M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda6   483633152  485730303   2097152     1G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda7   485730304  487827455   2097152     1G EFI System
/dev/sda8   487827456  974798847 486971392 232.2G Linux LVM
/dev/sda9   976746496 1181546495 204800000  97.7G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sda10 1181546496 1953523711 771977216 368.1G Linux LVM

Partition table entries are not in disk order.
1 Like

You have two EFI partitions, look at sda1 and sda7. That’s not good, as far as I know it should be only one. This can confuse at least some utitities/bootloaders, if not all.

Have to go now, will look closer from home. I’d say you change grub.cfg on one partition (sda7), but then boot from another (sda1) – and that’s the root of your problem. But let’s look more closely at the output first.

2 Likes

Yes when we created these, we didn’t realize that we could just use one partition for both Windows and Fedora. Keep in mind 28 other computers updated perfectly.

1 Like