Fedora 30 new install wifi

I am trying to install Fedora 30 to give it a try. I haven’t used RH since version 4.2 and am serious about Fedora. The install went fine but the initial boot up, wifi will not connect. Since with this a dual boot, I went to POP_OS/Ubuntu 19.04 and dumped out lshw -C network which is below. Any tips would be appreciated.

lshw -C network
WARNING: you should run this program as super-user.
  *-network                 
       description: Wireless interface
       product: Wireless-AC 9560 [Jefferson Peak]
       vendor: Intel Corporation
       physical id: 14.3
       bus info: pci@0000:00:14.3
       logical name: wlp0s20f3
       version: 10
       serial: 04:ea:56:b8:15:14
       width: 64 bits
       clock: 33MHz
       capabilities: bus_master cap_list ethernet physical wireless
       configuration: broadcast=yes driver=iwlwifi driverversion=5.0.0-25-generic firmware=43.95eb4e97.0 ip=192.168.0.18 latency=0 link=yes multicast=yes wireless=IEEE 802.11
       resources: irq:16 memory:b4718000-b471bfff
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It worked for me. Thanks

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Welcome to the Ask Fedora discourse! If their answer worked for you, feel free to mark it as accepted via the green check mark on the bottom.

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Question: Are these changes also pushed to other spins like Fedora Cinnamon? Thinking about giving it a try.

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The spin should use the same repository as the Fedora release it is based on.

You can also verify it with the following command:

dnf repolist

I think this topic is a good example why a netinstall has huge advantages: You download the latest packages where bugs have been fixed (or just been introduced).
You can also use the netinstall to choose your DE. no need to download different ISOs…

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One other option is using Live respins:

https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/live-respins/

They’re official Live ISOs (done by Fedora Respins SIG) regulary updated to include latest updates, bugfixes, etc.

Here’s some more info:

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For a new Fedora user this has been a very informative discussion. The netinstall may be a better option. With this update/fix it repaired broken WiFi which could mean not net access from a normal ISO.

Also, the live-respins, based on the date stamp, may not have the updates from yesterday applied as of yet.

Thanks again, I will probably migrate from POP_OS this weekend.

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Both methods have their stronger and weaker sides – as usual. live-respins allow offline installation and can be used for disaster recovery – but understandably can’t be updated daily.

Netinstall means smaller initial download and always up-to-date packages. It’s also very good for non-standard installations (minimal install, for example), when none of available spins suits your demands.

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If I understand your question correctly, with a “normal” iso (meaning the original, downloadable desktop iso) that fired up a Live system you didn’t have the problem because the bug was only introduced later with an update of that package. The next updated then fixed the problem again.

No, sorry, I did not explain very well.
I used an ISO to install on a secondary SSD and was never able to connect to WiFi. The update via CAT5 fixed the problem.

I decided this morning to fully leave Ubuntu/POP_OS and install Fedora 30 with the Gnome Environment. I used the Netinstall, and the initial steps of the install, it would not connect to WiFi. I connected to CAT5, and as it downloaded the installation files, WiFi was available on the first boot.

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This link helped me a lot

I had to manually install dkms, git and kernel-devel. (I’m on F30 XFCE)

git clone -b v5.3.4 https://github.com/aircrack-ng/rtl8812au.git
cd rtl*
sudo ./dkms-install.sh

Hi @fedaris! Welcome to Ask Fedora! Please have a look at the introductory posts in the #start-here category if you haven’t had a chance to do so.

Thanks for sharing!

To clarify a bit: the link you’ve posted is specific to Realtek RTL8812AU Wireless card / chipset, whereas @eclecticcoding’s computer uses wifi card with Intel 9560 chipset.

In general Intel’s wifi don’t need additional drivers and work out of the box – this is one of the reasons they are generally considered the best wireless chipsets to use with Linux. But there was a bug some time ago with their firmware, and it looks like @eclecticcoding was bitten by that bug.