LTS Version of Fedora

I’m thinking that it could be very nice if Fedora Community looks into a LTS version along with the Rolling versions that it brings every 6 months.

By LTS version I mean

  1. Latest LTS Kernel
  2. Latest LTS Desktop Environment
  3. Little old but more stable Packages
  4. Release cycle of 1 year and support of 2 years or a longer period

Though the Fedora Community is very well at bringing the latest software at very appreciable stability. There is a void left out there for much stability, though not as much as Debian is called for what I mean here is I observed Fedora 34 got very stable just before Fedora 35 beta is introduced and now is a very stable base for Desktop. Like that, if Fedora Community can plan an LTS release every year by allocating more testing periods for solving bugs and resolving the major issues it would be fantastic!

As far I know, the development cycle is Rawhide → Fedora → CentOS → commercial RedHat Enterprise Linux. In earlier times, CentOS was a community clone of Redhat Enterprise, now it is the the last step before the RHEL. Is CentOS not the LTS version you are looking for?

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This has been discussed before, I am sure you can find previous discussion in this forum and on mailing lists. The answer seems to be:

Fedora Linux is developed and supported by a community, which does not have the ressources to support a release for long-term.

Also Fedora Linux is dedicated to be a bleeding edge distro, not an LTS distro. The LTS equivalent of Fedora is CentOS or RHEL (see AlmaLinux for example)

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Oh! Okay. Thank you.
But how good is in your opinion for an average desktop user taking considerations of Web Browsing, Videos, Music, little video editing, lite programming,etc.,

If I need to compare it with Ubuntu, how would you distinguish it?

Fedora is often called “bleeding edge”. However I personally would reserve that term for Rawhide.
I use Fedora daily for work since Version 29 (KDE spin) and it continues to amaze me how they can be so up-to-date and reliable at the same time.

You could consider the approach of still using Fedora 34 for now. The project supports 2 releases (currently 34 and 35). Each release for 12-13 months. You could just use Fedora 34 until its EOL (2022-05-17) and let Fedora 35 “mature” before upgrading.

See also: Releases - Fedora Project Wiki

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Watch fedora is semi bleeding edge distribution and it was made in such a way that it can give us the most up to date offering of the linux community.
Now what i think you like fedora and you want a slightly more stable of fedora but not a extremely stable distros like debian or rhel alma rocky.
For your i think the best distro you should try is cent os steam 9 which is build on top of f34 and which is more stable and centos steam is something which will be upstream to rhel 9.

↓Rawhide
↓Fedora xx
↓Cent os steam x
↓Rhel x beta
↓Rhel x

Can you elaborate on how different is it from Fedora 34/ Fedora 35?
What is it release cycle?
Community support because community support on Fedora is outstanding?
What about fedora copr repos?

Cent os steam is actually fedora with some slight work from redhat. So most of the thing you find in fedora work on cent os steam.

Release cycle and Copr repos?

I told you it is just a testing ground before implemented in rhel and as rhel is a server grade os so it is extremely mature and stable packages that is why it is good for your need. As a desktop os.

Now if you want a lts then rhel and alma or rocky is good option which follows redhat linux.
Else you can try opensuse leap which is lts or debian or ubuntu lts.

Centos Stream is where stuff goes for testing/preview before going into the next redhat release. IMO, it is totally different than Fedora.

Also, many 3rd party products don’t support Centos Stream.

It is continuous stream of updates that support the development cycle for the next redhat version. If you are using Centos Stream 8 that means it basically has the same support cycle as Red Hat 8 with slightly newer software. If you are on Centos Stream 9, it is the pre-release state of Red Hat 9 until it is released. That means there will be little to no support for Centos Stream 9 at this point.

A copr repo has to target a specific OS. So if the copr repo supports the Centos Stream version you are on then “yes”, otherwise “no”. You would need to check the specific copr you are using.

Centos Stream is really much closer to Red Hat than Fedora

I have trouble calling Centos Stream the LTS version of Fedora(or the LTS version of anything really). Red Hat itself has an LTS model. If you want LTS, using Red Hat or one of it’s free clones AlmaLinux/Rocky Linux/Oracle Linux would be my recommendation.


Alternatively, live with the fact that you have to update Fedora once per year.

Personally, I like that Fedora releases every 6 months with support for a year. The shorter update cycles provide both access to newer software and smoother upgrades since you aren’t jumping up 2-3 years worth of updates at a time. Also, if you want stability, you can upgrade mid-cycle once the initial teething problems are worked out. Waiting 30-45 days to upgrade after a new version release makes a big difference in my experience.

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Yes i also didn’t called cent os steam as a lts but as he said he want a stable distro like fedora 34 so as cent os steam 9 build on f34 and it is stable but not upto the lts level but far newer packages as far my knowledge goes so it is a good balence else fedora 34 is also a good option as it has its life it is supported for 13 months…
And i was wrong centos steam is closer to redhat but for a general user it is same as fedora.

Alternatively, live with the fact that you have to update Fedora once per year.

Personally, I like that Fedora releases every 6 months with support for a year. The shorter update cycles provide both access to newer software and smoother upgrades since you aren’t jumping up 2-3 years worth of updates at a time. Also, if you want stability, you can upgrade mid-cycle once the initial teething problems are worked out. Waiting 30-45 days to upgrade after a new version release makes a big difference in my experience.

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martin lutherfrankjunior

1h

Yes i also didn’t called cent os steam as a lts but as he said he want a stable distro like fedora 34 so as cent os steam 9 build on f34 and it is stable but not upto the lts level but far newer packages as far my knowledge goes so it is a good balence else fedora 34 is also a good option as it has its life it is supported for 13 months…
And i was wrong centos steam is closer to redhat but for a general user it is same as fedora.

Yes! I’m planning to do that from the next update onwards!
Thank you

Regardless of the relationships between the distributions, it makes sense to summarize that Fedora itself is not intended for LTS approaches beyond 1 year. If you want to have LTS and stay as close to Fedora as possible, you should consider CentOS Stream, RockyLinux or AlmaLinux.

Regarding Hemanth’s purposes (video, music, video editing), CentOS Stream probably makes the most sense. For general users & the mentioned purposes, it should possibly be noted that the EPEL repository should be added. The availability of packages is likely to be the biggest difference/issue in this respect.

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Amazon Linux might be just the thing for this LTS you are looking for.